2019 Summer of ’68

May 22, 2019 by  
Filed under podcast

Ed Kasputis interviews author, Tim Wendel about his book, Summer of ’68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever.

From the beginning, ’68 was a season rocked by national tragedy and sweeping change. Opening Day was postponed and later played in the shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s funeral. That summer, as the pennant races were heating up, the assassination of Robert Kennedy was later followed by rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But even as tensions boiled over and violence spilled into the streets, something remarkable was happening in major league ballparks across the country. Pitchers were dominating like never before, and with records falling and shut-outs mounting, many began hailing ’68 as “The Year of the Pitcher.”

Meanwhile in Detroit—which had burned just the summer before during one of the worst riots in American history—’68 instead found the city rallying together behind a colorful Tigers team led by Denny McLain, Mickey Lolich, Willie Horton, and Al Kaline. The Tigers would finish atop the American League, setting themselves on a highly anticipated collision course with Bob Gibson’s Cardinals.

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2017 Summer of ’68

June 7, 2017 by  
Filed under podcast

Ed Kasputis interviews author, Tim Wendel about his book, Summer of ’68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever.

From the beginning, ’68 was a season rocked by national tragedy and sweeping change. Opening Day was postponed and later played in the shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s funeral. That summer, as the pennant races were heating up, the assassination of Robert Kennedy was later followed by rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But even as tensions boiled over and violence spilled into the streets, something remarkable was happening in major league ballparks across the country. Pitchers were dominating like never before, and with records falling and shut-outs mounting, many began hailing ’68 as “The Year of the Pitcher.”

Meanwhile in Detroit—which had burned just the summer before during one of the worst riots in American history—’68 instead found the city rallying together behind a colorful Tigers team led by Denny McLain, Mickey Lolich, Willie Horton, and Al Kaline. The Tigers would finish atop the American League, setting themselves on a highly anticipated collision course with Bob Gibson’s Cardinals.

Play

2016 Minicast – Summer of ’68

July 20, 2016 by  
Filed under minicast

Episode 181 - Summer of '68

Ed Kasputis interviews author, Tim Wendel about his book, Summer of ’68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever.

From the beginning, ’68 was a season rocked by national tragedy and sweeping change. Opening Day was postponed and later played in the shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s funeral. That summer, as the pennant races were heating up, the assassination of Robert Kennedy was later followed by rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But even as tensions boiled over and violence spilled into the streets, something remarkable was happening in major league ballparks across the country. Pitchers were dominating like never before, and with records falling and shut-outs mounting, many began hailing ’68 as “The Year of the Pitcher.”

Meanwhile in Detroit—which had burned just the summer before during one of the worst riots in American history—’68 instead found the city rallying together behind a colorful Tigers team led by Denny McLainMickey LolichWillie Horton, and Al Kaline. The Tigers would finish atop the American League, setting themselves on a highly anticipated collision course with Bob Gibson’s Cardinals.

Play

2014 Minicast – The Summer of ’68

May 19, 2014 by  
Filed under minicast

Episode 181 - Summer of '68

Ed Kasputis interviews author, Tim Wendel about his book, Summer of ’68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever.

From the beginning, ’68 was a season rocked by national tragedy and sweeping change. Opening Day was postponed and later played in the shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s funeral. That summer, as the pennant races were heating up, the assassination of Robert Kennedy was later followed by rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But even as tensions boiled over and violence spilled into the streets, something remarkable was happening in major league ballparks across the country. Pitchers were dominating like never before, and with records falling and shut-outs mounting, many began hailing ’68 as “The Year of the Pitcher.”

Meanwhile in Detroit—which had burned just the summer before during one of the worst riots in American history—’68 instead found the city rallying together behind a colorful Tigers team led by Denny McLainMickey LolichWillie Horton, and Al Kaline. The Tigers would finish atop the American League, setting themselves on a highly anticipated collision course with Bob Gibson’s Cardinals.

Play

Minicast – Summer of ’68

March 18, 2013 by  
Filed under minicast

Episode 181 - Summer of '68

Ed Kasputis interviews author, Tim Wendel about his book, Summer of ’68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever.

From the beginning, ’68 was a season rocked by national tragedy and sweeping change. Opening Day was postponed and later played in the shadow of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s funeral. That summer, as the pennant races were heating up, the assassination of Robert Kennedy was later followed by rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago. But even as tensions boiled over and violence spilled into the streets, something remarkable was happening in major league ballparks across the country. Pitchers were dominating like never before, and with records falling and shut-outs mounting, many began hailing ’68 as “The Year of the Pitcher.”

Meanwhile in Detroit—which had burned just the summer before during one of the worst riots in American history—’68 instead found the city rallying together behind a colorful Tigers team led by Denny McLain, Mickey Lolich, Willie Horton, and Al Kaline. The Tigers would finish atop the American League, setting themselves on a highly anticipated collision course with Bob Gibson’s Cardinals.

 

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2011 Atlanta Braves

April 21, 2011 by  
Filed under podcast

Downtown, Midtown and Buckhead, it’s all great for us.  Our PhD Committee is in the Capitol of the South – Atlanta.  Ed, Farley & Mark talk about those Braves, then we get some Baseball PhD culture.  Ernie Harwell was from Atlanta and Margaret Mitchell‘s paperboy.  First Ed interviews Joanna Arrieta from the Margaret Mitchell House as we  learn about Mitchell’s life and her greatest work, Gone With The Wind. Ed then interviews Steve Klein from The King Center.  The podcast concludes as we say good bye to Atlanta and hello to the highest ballpark in the Majors – Coors Field in Denver.

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The King Center

April 19, 2011 by  
Filed under News

This week is Braves’ week and as part of our next podcast we’ll explore The King Center as Ed Kasputis interviews Steve Klein.  Who can forget the impact that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had on America along with the unforgettable sound of the tomahawk chop?  All this and more during our next podcast which will be released on Friday, April 22nd.  Go Braves!!!

I Have A Dream – August 28, 1963

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Tomahawk Chop

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Atlanta Braves Team Pulse
Listen to our 2010 Atlanta Braves Podcast

Past Posts about the Atlanta Braves

Kasputis’ Brave Prediction Rings True

The Impossible True Story

Turner Field

1995 World Champion Atlanta Braves

Tomahawk Chop